The best beaches in the Cayman Islands are among the archipelago’s most iconic attractions, offering miles of powder-white sand overlooking the Caribbean Sea. The largest island, Grand Cayman, is a popular cruise port and an excellent jump-off point for other attractions on its northern sister islands of Cayman Brac and Little Cayman.

    The best time to visit the islands is from December to May – these months are outside the usual hurricane season. You can enjoy various water sports, unwind on sunbeds, and have a drink at many beach bars. Check out our guide to the Cayman Islands’ most popular beaches.

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    Rum Point, Grand Cayman

    A tranquil beach that offers various water sports

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    Rum Point lies north of Grand Cayman, far from the cruise ship crowds of the country's capital, George Town. You can find many huts, beach chairs, picnic tables, and hammocks near the shore. Great food and drinks are available from nearby establishments, such as Wreck Bar & Grill – try its famous rum-infused Mudslide cocktail. Young children and novice swimmers will enjoy the beach's shallow water.

    Kayaking, windsurfing, parasailing, stand-up paddleboarding, and jet skiing are some of the best things to do in Rum Point. Interested in marine life? You can go snorkelling in Barrier Reef, where over 100 coral species and colourful fish reside. There are also daily tours to the Stingray Sandbar.

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    2

    West Bay Beach, Grand Cayman

    Rarely crowded with a great sunset view

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    West Bay Beach's coastline is rocky in some spots, but it offers one of the best sunset viewing experiences in the Cayman Islands. The beach is also the take-off point of diving tours to the Kittiwake Shipwreck & Artificial Reef. 

    If you want to enjoy a horseback-riding experience, you can join Spirit of the West's Caribbean Sea Swim or Moonlight Stroll. West Bay also has a unique attraction called Hell, a black spiky limestone formation that’s as wide as half a football field.

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    3

    Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman

    Aquatic sports hub and home to the island's best resorts

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    Seven Mile Beach isn't exactly 7 miles, but more like 5.5 to 6 miles of sand on Grand Cayman's western coast. Because it’s a public beach, you're free to walk the entirety of its coral sand waterfront. Equipment for water sports is available for rent.

    You'll find many of the main island's hotels and condos around Seven Mile Beach. With its flour-soft sand and casuarinas and coconut trees, this beach is one of the Cayman Islands' most beautiful stretches. It’s just 6 km north of George Town and visible from the main road.

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    4

    Starfish Point, Grand Cayman

    Venture the deep or wait for the sea stars to reach the shallows

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    Starfish Point is a snorkeller's delight, with around a dozen sea stars visible on the sandy floor of its shallow waters. But if you want to see more of them in their seagrass habitat, you'll have to go beyond its drop-off that's about 3 metres deep. These colourful creatures are safe to hold as long as they stay submerged in water.

    Overlooking North Sound, Starfish Point is around 41 km northeast of George Town.  Many yacht operators can take you to this secluded beach – some even offer water-skiing, wave-running, and wakeboarding as additional activities.

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    5

    Spotts Beach, Grand Cayman

    Southside beach where wild turtles roam

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    Spotts Beach is a great place to spot sea turtles in Grand Cayman. These gentle creatures feed on its seagrass beds in the early mornings and late afternoons. Start your day here with a nice sunrise view, followed by breakfast under the shade of a cabana.

    There’s a barrier reef some 90 metres from the coast, where coral, parrotfish, silvery-yellow jacks, and snappers reside. However, it’s best suited for experienced snorkellers and swimmers due to strong currents and the absence of lifeguards.

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    6

    Smith's Barcadere, Grand Cayman

    Shore-based snorkelling on South Sound

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    Smith's Barcadere (formerly known as Smith Cove) is located in South Sound, around 4.5 km of George Town. You can spend the whole day exploring fish life amid calm waters surrounded by limestone outcrops. A squid might just swim up close to you from the beach’s coral-covered rocks.

    It's best to check Grand Cayman port's ship schedules when planning your visit to ensure there won't be any obstructions and fewer tourists. Outdoor showers and picnic tables are available at Smith's Barcadere.

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    7

    Barker's National Park, Grand Cayman

    Go on birdwatching or horseback-riding excursions

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    Barker’s National Park features an undeveloped beach with a narrow but long shoreline that's protected by dense mangrove trees and reefs. Located on Grand Cayman's northwest coast, this is a great spot for hiking, biking, and horseback riding.

    The beach is a haven for resident and migratory birds, such as brown pelicans, herons, and egrets. The Antillean nighthawk has a nesting ground on Volgunner's Pond. Kitesurfing novices and veterans alike come to Barker’s National Park for its favourable wind conditions and moderate swells.

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    photo by David Stanley (CC BY 2.0) modified

    8

    Point of Sand Beach, Little Cayman

    Crystal clear waters on the eastern end of Little Cayman

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    Point of Sand Beach is Little Cayman's main swimming zone that features a protective reef line and a soft seabed. It’s located at the south-eastern tip of the island, so beach frolickers can view Cayman Brac from the horizon.

    Most tourists from the northern sister island visit Sand Point, as the beach is also called, as part of a day tour. The water level stays up to the ankles for about 4.5 metres away from the shore. Plenty of queen conch, reef fish, and bonefish are found in the water, attracting snorkelers who don't mind the strong current.

    Phone: +1 345-938-2279

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    9

    Long Beach, Cayman Brac

    Dramatic coastal scenery from atop the bluff

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    Long Beach is known for offering elevated views of the Cayman Islands. Located on the eastern tip of Cayman Brac, its 45-metre-high limestone bluff is very popular among seasoned hikers. If you're not up for a 2-hour trail, opt for a seabird-sighting experience on the base of the bluff. The brown booby takes up residence on the cliff’s ledges and caves.  

    Long Beach is also part of the route of Active Pursuit's biking tours, which include a visit to local caves and a 9-metre-tall lighthouse.

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    10

    Colliers Beach, Grand Cayman

    Gathering place of blowhole viewers and kite surfers

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    Colliers Beach (or East End Beach) is found on the north-eastern side of Grand Cayman. It’s near the famous blowholes, where water shoots up 15 metres high or so from the rocky shore. Plan a weekday trip to this beach, as the place gets crowded on weekends.

    The snorkelling zone is way offshore, but you're likely to see tiny fish wiggling their way around turtlegrass within the shallow part of the water. Colliers Beach attracts kitesurfers with its onshore winds. You can go kiting for miles, even over the Wreck of the Ten Sail memorial.

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    Geri Mileva | Contributing Writer

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